Consultation Paper

The JUDS project is about unlocking the potential of data to help drive poverty eradication and sustainable development, because while more and more data is becoming available, the vital information it holds often remains inaccessible as it’s being published in different formats or standards. The aim of this consultation paper is to start a discussion on what technical and political solutions could look like at a global level.

You can feedback on our consultation paper via this form or via email on info@joinedupdata.org. We hope to receive a broad range of responses to this consultation from international standard setting institutions, open data standard initiatives, data producing organisations and the users of development data themselves.

We invite responses to this consultation, and look forward to hearing from you.

From Principles to Practice: a consultation paper on joined-up data standards

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From Principles to Practice: a consultation paper on joined-up data standards

     Data has immense potential to help drive poverty eradication and international development, but it remains incredibly difficult to join up data on resources, people and re ...

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Data has immense potential to help drive poverty eradication and international development, but it remains incredibly difficult to join up data on resources, people and results because it is published in different formats and to different standards. Overcoming this challenge requires both technical solutions and political will. The challenge facing governments, international institutions, civil society, academics and the private sector alike is how to make sense of the vast quantities of data now being generated in order to create a coherent, holistic picture.

The aims of the Joined-up Data Standards project are to: explore the problems caused by incompatible data in international development; work with partners to find common solutions to these problems; and to build international consensus that all data should be joined up. We have to date produced four discussion papers that cumulatively explore: the way in which global institutions define and classify geographic, sectoral and results data; the overlaps that occur between competing standards; and the policy landscape that governs international data standard setting.

This paper aims to start a discussion on what practical solutions to joining up data standards could look like.