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Beata is the Data Scientist working on the technical side of Joined-up Data Standards from Development Initiatives’ Bristol office. Beata’s work focuses on mapping and linking data standards. She also develops and maintains the thesaurus. Beata finished her PhD in metabolic modelling of microbial systems at the University of Bath in 2015. She holds a MSc in Bioinformatics from Imperial College London and a BSc in Biotechnology from Cardiff University.

Comment ( 1 )

  1. ReplyTim Davies
    Thanks for this post. Really good to hear the explorations of the histories of the different standards. This reminded me of the book 'Standards and their Stories': http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/?GCOI=80140100437450 which explores a number of cases, including quite a few from biology. I'm not sure though it will always make sense to solve all these problems through standards: some might need to just be finding tools and processes for parallel sense-making and classification within different systems. For example, as the other key book on standards: 'Sorting Things Out, Classification and Its Consequences' - https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/sorting-things-out - establishing things like disease classifications related to political and funding priorities can have long-lasting, and counter-intuitive impacts over the long-run

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